It's The 'Military Bowl' This Year At RFK Stadium | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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It's The 'Military Bowl' This Year At RFK Stadium

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Wednesday, the University of Maryland faces East Carolina University in the Military Bowl college football game at RFK Stadium.

During its first two years, the game was known as the EagleBank Bowl. But this year, Northrop Grumman took over as chief sponsor, giving the game a whole new identity according to Steve Beck, the bowl's president.

"It's sort of right in your face...the Military Bowl. That states what our purpose is: it's to support the military. And to have a substantial economic effect on Washington, D.C. But our primary goal is to support...the men and women that are supporting us," Beck says.

Proceeds from the game will go the USO. Beck expects this year's game to set the bowl's attendance record, as both schools have already sold their allotment of tickets.

The bowl will also be the final one for Ralph Friedgen as head coach of Maryland. The final year of his contract was bought out in a move that stirred controversy, as Friedgen had been named the coach of the year this season in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The move will cost the school $2 million.

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