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History Through Photos: The University Of Maryland

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By Jeanine Herbst

Archivist Jason Speck says he chose the most crucial moments of the University of Maryland's history and then found the photos to tell the story for his new book, "University of Maryland." The book includes the 1912 fire, destroying a couple of buildings, to Testudo, the mascot.

"Testudo was created in 1933, and there's a picture in the book of the unveiling of the first Testudo statue by the actual diamondback terrapin that was the physical model for the statue," Speck says. "We actually have the diamondback terrapin in the university archives, preserved all these many years later so people can come see it."

And he says the book isn't just for historians. He says many students want information relating to them, now that the university has become so diverse.

"Whether it's a history class or a journalism class, or an English class, a lot of them want to know...'When did the first people of my particular ethnic group or gender start coming to school here? When did they first get their degrees?'" he says.

Speck, son-in-law of Bill Redlin, says the photos run from the 1850s to President Obama's speech at the Comcast Center.

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