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Travel Delays May Continue

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A flight information screen at Dulles International Airport shows cancelled flights in the region.
David Farrington
A flight information screen at Dulles International Airport shows cancelled flights in the region.

The blizzard that's dumped snow on areas stretching from the Carolinas to Maine hasn't had much affected the D.C. region, unless you're traveling by air.

The blizzard has left thousands stranded, including several hundred at D.C. airports. And, according to Courtney Mickalonis, spokesperson for the Washington Metropolitan Airports Authority, the effects may continue to be felt.

"It usually takes a few days for the airline system to get everything back into order after a major storm or winter weather event like we had this weekend," Mickalonis says.

So even if you are flying somewhere with good weather, she says you should check with your airline before you leave for the airport.

MARC and Virginia Railway Express commuter trains are running on normal schedules, and Amtrak service between D.C. and New York is not affected, but service will be limited between New York and Boston.


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