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Medical Examiner Report Raises More Questions About Death Outside DC9

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The Office of D.C.'s Chief Medical Examiner says the death of a man outside a nightclub in October was a homicide.

A statement from the medical examiner's office says Ali Mohammed's death was caused by several factors: "excited delirium Associated with arrhythmogenic cardiac anomalies, alcohol intoxication and physical exertion with restraint."

The office did not elaborate -- except to say that the manner of death was homicide.

Mohammed died Oct. 15 after reportedly throwing a brick through the window of the DC9 nightclub along the U Street corridor in Northwest. The owner of the club and four employees reportedly chased Mohammed down, and were initially charged with second-degree murder.

But those charges were later dropped. The U.S. Attorney's Office said there was not sufficient basis to back them up -- though it said additional charges could be filed later.

Now the U.S. Attorney's office says it will carefully study the conlusions of the medical examiner as part of its ongoing investigation.

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