'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(Dec. 22-Jan. 9) GLITTER AND BE GAY If your Wednesday looks like it may end up lacking some musical theater, there's "Candide" at Washington's Sidney Harman Hall Wednesday through the first week of 2011. Leonard Bernstein's adaptation of Voltaire's satire follows Candide from a sheltered paradise to a quotidian struggle that comically challenges his optimistic outlook on life and love.

(Dec. 22) HEMP, DRIED FLOWERS, GLOSSY GLAZE, AND PRESTO! Washington's Tonic Restaurant in Mount Pleasant shows some love to local artist Kreg David Kelley through next year. The painter employs traditional tools as well as naturally occurring materials –- like hemp and dried flowers -– to create colorful modernist portraits.

(Dec. 22-Jan. 15) HOLDING UP/GOING HOME Two artists share the spotlight in holding up / going home at Hamiltonian Gallery on U Street in Northwest through mid-January. Both tackle the disposability of objects: one with paintings of geometric structures that resemble our trash and the other with sculptural fusions of industrial materials.

Music bed: Across The Sea by Hanoi Janes

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