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Threats Against Metro On Facebook Put Man Behind Bars Without Bail

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A man from Northern Virginia, who the FBI says made threats to blow up Metro trains, is behind bars after a federal judge's ruling Tuesday.

A federal judge refused to grant bail to Awais Younis, a 25-year-old from Arlington. The FBI arrested Younis last week after one of his friends gave authorities a transcript of a conversation on Facebook.

Younis reportedly threatened the friend and talked about placing pipe bombs on Metro trains and in the Georgetown neighborhood. FBI agents also say they found photos of Younis on Facebook that show him posing with firearms, and U.S. attorney spokesman Peter Carr says they found images of the al-Qaida flag on his home computer.

But Younis is not facing terrorism charges. Rather, he's charged with using interstate communications to make threats.

Carr also says Younis has younger brothers who have been arrested on drug charges after authorities discovered 12 pounds of marijuana and more than $22,000 at their home. And, he says, Younis has been an extensive drug user since the age of 16.

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