WAMU 88.5 : News

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

Play associated audio

(Dec. 20-Feb. 27) BLACK BOX DE BEECK Belgian artist Hans Op de Beeck is something of a renaissance man when it comes to art. Op hops from sculpture, to photography, to animation and even short-story writing to portray scenes both real and surreal. Black Box showcases the artist's playful depictions of archetypal spaces at the Hirshhorn Museum on the National Mall through late February.

(Dec. 20-23) FICTIONS OF NATURE Sculptor Bill Moore gets playful with the animal kingdom in Fictions of Nature at Hillyer Art Space in Northwest Washington. Moore produces oversized bronze sculptures of insects, fish and birds in unnatural and fantastical situations. You can bear witness to tiger beetles in shining armor and other gems through Thursday.

(Dec. 21) HOMETOWN HERO D.C. rapper Wale has endless love for the DMV. That's the District, Maryland and Virginia, not the Department of Motor Vehicles. The self-proclaimed "Ambassador of Rap for the Capital" has gone from local sensation to national heavyweight with his witty wordplay and go-go-inspired beats. Wale plays Washington's 9:30 Club Tuesday night.

Background music: World Tour (Instrumental) by Wale


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
WAMU 88.5

World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.