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SuperShuttle Driver Faces Hit-And-Run Charges In Virginia

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A SuperShuttle van driver was arrested outside the main terminal at Dulles Airport Monday morning after ramming at least six cars along I-66. Police have identified the driver involved as Muhammed Teshale, a 25-year-old SuperShuttle van driver from Alexandria.

"Based on witness statements and from the van's driver, he was traveling between 90 and 95 miles per hour when he was headed westbound on I-66 and was striking these various vehicles," says Corinne Geller, a spokesperson with Virginia State Police. "Alcohol was not a factor in the crashes but as to his motive, that's still under investigation."

Investigators say after hitting the vehicles, Teshale failed to stop before entering the Dulles Airport road. Virginia State Police are seeking four felony hit-and-run charges against Teshale.

Arlington County Police and Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority may also charge seek charges against the driver.

Teshale has been transported to Fairfax adult detention center.

NBC4 video about the incident:

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