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Cold Highlights Common-Sense, Energy-Saving Measures

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This has been the coldest week of the winter so far for D.C.-area residents, and not a bad time to think about how well your house holds in heat.

On Thursday Dominion Power crews sealed up drafty windows and door frames in three townhomes occupied by families transitioning away from homelessness in Reston, Va.

The changes will make for a warmer and cheaper winter, but design supervisor Bob Doniel also spent a few minutes fixing a broken window screen, something that could make a difference in the summer.

"We want them to be able to open their windows, and if the screens are in disrepair, they may not open up the windows, which would help with their cooling...in the summertime," Doniel says.

Dominion conservation specialist Alison Kaufmann says helping customers save energy makes sense for a company trying to meet energy demands.

"One way that we see how we can fill that energy gap and extra demand is by helping people conserve," she says.

Kaufmann says air-leaks can account for as much as 15 percent of a household energy bill.

NPR

A Hollywood Animal Trainer's Secrets For Getting Dogs To Act On Cue

Teresa Ann Miller often works with distracted performers, but the Hungarian film White God was especially challenging. "The dogs just thought it was a party," she says of the film's dog-pack scene.
WAMU 88.5

The Democracy Of The Diner

Whether the decor is faux '50s silver and neon or authentic greasy spoon, diners are classic Americana, down to the familiar menu items. Rich, poor, black, white--all rub shoulders in the vinyl booths and at formica counters. We explore the enduring appeal and nostalgia of the diner.

WAMU 88.5

D.C. Council Member David Grosso

D.C. Council Member and Chair of the Committee on Education David Grosso joins us to discuss local public policy issues, including the challenges facing D.C. Public Schools.

NPR

Texting While Walking: Are You Cautious Or Clueless?

People who text while walking change their pace and seem to walk more cautiously, a study says. But that doesn't mean you're not a menace to yourself and others.

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