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Interim Schools Chancellor Appoints New Principal To Dunbar

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Interim D.C. Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson has appointed a new principal for Dunbar High School. She says the change in leadership is necessary to keep students and teachers safe. The new appointment comes after a student was reportedly raped on school grounds

Outside Dunbar High school on Thursday, three police cars were parked out front. Inside, additional security guards manned metal detectors as students trickle through the front doors.

"We've increased security immediately. We've taken extraordinary precautions to make sure that learning can happen in this building again. Safety is our number one priority -- student and teacher safety -- and today we're taking action," says Fred Lewis, assistant press secretary for the school.

The added security features come as Stephen Jackson returns as principal of the school Thursday. He had resigned over the summer.

Under Jackson's leadership, the school is set to implement a new security plan, which could involve changes in class scheduling and student testing.

Also, Dunbar will no longer operate as a partnership school under the management direction of Friends of Bedford.

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