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Driving Under The Influence: Higher Rates At Younger Ages

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In an average year, 30 million Americans drive while drunk and 10 million drive while impaired by illicit drugs, according to a new report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The group surveyed U.S. drivers and found that teens and young adults had much higher rates for driving intoxicated.

"We asked individuals in the past year, had they used drugs or alcohol while driving, and we looked at both national and state estimates," Delany says.

The information indicates that nearly 20 percent of drivers, aged 16 to 25, had recently driven under the influence. That number drops to nearly 12 percent for drivers in the age group of 26 years and older.

For the D.C. metropolitan area, the numbers reflect a general decrease in irresponsible driving since the group's last report, which surveyed drivers from 2000 to 2005, says Dr. Peter Delany, who works for the group.

NPR

Peruvians Love Their Chicha Street Art. The Government ... Not So Much

Walk down a street in Peru and you'll likely see an example of the glow-in-the-dark posters and murals. Lots of people love them. But the upper crust — and the government — aren't impressed.
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Tea-Infused Sweets: Chocolate + Jasmine Tea Is A Match Made In Heaven

Smoky and floral brews can provide a kick of flavor to desserts, especially when blended with chocolate. Pastry chef Naomi Gallego shows us a few tricks for surprising the palate with tea.
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Carnival Receives U.S. Permission To Operate Cruises To Cuba

Carnival has received U.S. permission to begin operating cruises to Cuba. The cruises will be offered through the company's new fathom brand, a cruise line that specializes in what the company calls "social impact travel." Passengers will travel under the categories approved by the Treasury Department, allowing people to visit only if they engage in activities that support the Cuban people.
WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

The president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, chats about the future of higher education — and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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