Wolf Calls For Scrutiny Of Dulles Metro Project | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Wolf Calls For Scrutiny Of Dulles Metro Project

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Northern Virginia Congressman Frank Wolf wants the finances of the multibillion-dollar Dulles Metrorail project to be more closely scrutinized.

Wolf wants to hire a group of independent auditors to continuously monitor the $5 billion project, which is being managed by the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority.

He says he wants the audit not because of anything the Authority has done wrong.

"I just think it's just a good idea," Wolf says.

The project to extend Metro out to Dulles Airport is one of the largest public works projects in the country. And Wolf, who oversaw the infamously protracted construction of Boston's Big Dig highway, says these kinds of projects can quickly spiral out of control.

"After looking after the Big Dig and having experienced how they let that thing go for too long," he says, "I just want to make sure at the beginning, we do it well here."

The first phase of the Metrorail project out to Tysons Corner is already under construction and will begin running in three years. The second phase -- from Tysons to the airport -- doesn't have a start date yet.

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