'Transforming Tysons' Open House Offers Residents Glimpse Into Future | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Transforming Tysons' Open House Offers Residents Glimpse Into Future

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In Virginia, the plan to transform Tysons Corner is slowly moving forward. Monday night, some local residents got their first glimpse of what the transformation will look like.

More than 100 residents made their way around the cafeteria at Marshall High School, where renderings of seven of the first projects proposed under the new Tysons Corner building guidelines were on display.

Fairfax County Supervisor Cathy Hudgins was pleased with the turnout and the mixed-use building proposals.

"The buildings are vertical," she says. "That's something different for a lot of folks in Fairfax County."

Many residents say they were impressed by what the future of Tysons could look like, but some also expressed doubts about the changes.

John McNicholas was worried there won't be enough parking for all the new people and was also concerned about a planned office building that would displace his favorite restaurant: Clyde's.

"That concerns me because that's my neighborhood [place to] go to get a drink or a sandwich," he says.

Clyde's Restaurant Group says it has no plans to close its Tysons location.

The estimated completion date for the first of these projects is late 2013 or early 2014. That's also when the first metrorail trains will be rolling through Tysons.

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