'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(Dec. 7-Feb. 13) SUNSET BLVD Arlington's Signature Theatre is ready for its close-up. Andrew Lloyd Webber's Hollywood musical Sunset Boulevard opens today and runs until mid-February. An aging silent film star aims to make a comeback while backed by a 20-piece orchestra in the classic tale of love, lust, and revenge.

(Dec. 8-18) WIFE SWAPPERS There's bound to be at least a little love and lust in Wife Swappers playing tomorrow through Dec. 18 at DC Arts Center on 18th Street in Northwest Washington. Los Angeles playwright Justin Tanner's mediation on conservative mores gone wrong follows a married couple as they swing in Orange County, Calif.

(Dec. 7-Jan. 14) POPPENHUIZEN Sculptor Sarah Lindley goes Dutch at Washington's cross mckenzie gallery through mid-January. The artist fashions half-scale ceramic renditions of 17th and 18th century Dutch dollhouses or "poppenhuizen." The skeletal miniatures scrupulously portray the lavish lifestyles of the era's elite.

Background music: Oh, Lady Be Good by Count Basie and the Kansas City 7

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