: News

Filed Under:

House's New Leadership Makes Caucus Members Uneasy

Play associated audio

As House Democrats prepare to turn the reins of power back to Republicans, some caucus members worry the incoming speaker may reverse some diversity programs on Capitol Hill.

In April, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi kicked off a new diversity initiative for Hill staffers. Legislative department heads are required to periodically report on the diversity of their staffs and a resume bank was established to foster a more diverse hiring pool for Congress.

Members of the House Tri-Caucus, which consists of the Black, Hispanic and Asian Pacific American Caucus, are pressuring the Republican leaders to make further advances in the program. New York Congressmember Nydia Velázquez, chair of the Hispanic Caucus, is among those being vocal about the initiative.

"It is important that we stress the issue that blacks, Latinos, women...could make an important contribution in terms of public policy, committees' work. And I guess it's a reminder that we need to continue to increase the numbers," Velázquez says.

The head of the Republican transition team says party leaders haven't reviewed the policy yet. Velázquez says she's worried the new leaders on Capitol Hill will quietly unwind the program.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Aug. 4, 2015

You can see two exhibits and rub elbows with the artists behind the work.
NPR

Judge Strikes Down Idaho 'Ag-Gag' Law, Raising Questions For Other States

A judge ruled Monday that an Idaho law criminalizing undercover investigations of farms is unconstitutional. Seven states have similar laws, but legal experts say they may not stand much longer.
NPR

Privacy Advocates To Senate Cyber Security Bill

The Senate is considering a bill to make it easier for businesses and the government to share data about cyber threats. Proponents say it would enhance security; opponents call it surveillance.
NPR

Sexist Reactions To An Ad Spark #ILookLikeAnEngineer Campaign

After being surprised by online responses to her appearance in a recruiting ad, engineer Isis Wenger wanted to see if anyone else felt like they didn't fit a "cookie-cutter mold."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.