: News

Annapolis Conference Pushing For 'Winds of Change'

Play associated audio

Organizers say this weekend's Wind Vision conference in Annapolis was the first time representatives from the labor, political, and environmental worlds got together with the general public to have a real discussion about offshore wind.

There were as many questions as there were speakers at the Westin Hotel. Would the wind farm proposed off the Ocean City coastline help lower electric bills in Baltimore? When could unemployed Marylanders expect to land one of the 4,000 projected green collar jobs?

But for the most part, it was a day calling people to support an industry that really doesn't exist yet.

"When you invest in a wind farm and the basic infrastructure, it'll last as long as the earth itself," says keynote speaker and environmental activist Lester Brown.

But Maryland still uses coal as the source for more than half its energy, so the big message was that there is still lots of work to be done.

State Sen. Paul Pinsky challenged his fellow Maryland lawmakers to pass legislation in 2011 that will help offshore projects secure longterm power purchasing agreements with utility companies.

"I think we can help make this motion forward and get it passed," Pinsky says.

Brown told the crowd that offshore wind is not only the answer for solving the states energy concerns, but also the new industry that could help solve economic ones.

NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.