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WTU Names New President After Long, Close Race

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Nathan Saunders has been named the new president of the Washington Teachers' Union, which represents approximately 4,000 D.C. public school teachers.

Saunders recieved 556 votes, beating out incumbent George Parker, who recieved 480.

Saunders called this a victory for teachers, saying he would move forward "aggressively and progressively" to push for teachers' rights. He and his new vice president, Candi Peterson, have been vocal opponents of former Chancellor Michelle Rhee's education reform in the District. And some of his biggest supporters were teachers who were laid off by Rhee last October.

The WTU election were supposed to have been conducted in Spring, but the process was marred with so much in-fighting that the parent union, the American Federation of Teachers, had to place the WTU under what's called "administratorship" so elections could be held.

The new WTU officers will begin their three-year term Wednesday.

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