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Chantilly Web Retailer Grows Despite Down Economy

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Black Friday and Cyber Monday have come and gone. Now online retailers, including many headquartered in Northern Virginia's Technology Corridor are counting the numbers. One fast-growing company in Chantilly, CedarPC, continues to see the benefit of its online retail presence.

John Vuong is the CEO of CedarPC, a company that specializes in selling refurbished computers to consumers at low prices.

"So if you buy something from a major retailer like Wal-Mart, Staples, Best Buy, and you return them, chances are it gets sorted out, and sent to us, and we would refurbish them and then put them for sale on our Web site," Vuong says.

The past few days have been busy: More than 200 online orders have been shipped out since Thanksgiving.

Vuong says the shopping craze following Thanksgiving isn't just hype -- it's an opportunity. CedarPC.com saw a tenfold increase in Web traffic in the past few days.

And even with the flagging economy, CedarPC sales have doubled each year since 2003. Vuong says that's partly because even more people are looking for good deals online.

"So as long as people like discounts, I'm sure we'll be around," he says.

Vuong says this year CedarPC sales are projected to top $7 million.

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