Metro Tests Buses That Give Verbal Warnings To Pedestrians, Drivers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Metro Tests Buses That Give Verbal Warnings To Pedestrians, Drivers

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Metrobus drivers are concerned over safety after supervisors forced them to leave the bus garage before finishing their required safety checks Wednesday.
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Metrobus drivers are concerned over safety after supervisors forced them to leave the bus garage before finishing their required safety checks Wednesday.

Metro is working to improve its safety record by piloting a new audio warning device on some Metrobuses. The devices are designed to help reduce pedestrian accidents.

The new recordings alert pedestrians when a Metrobus makes a turn at an intersection: "Pedestrians, bus is turning." And this voice command is heard inside the bus: "Caution, look both ways." This reminder is intended to alert Metrobus drivers to be aware of their surroundings.

A spokesperson for the transit agency says devices like this one have been successful in other cities, and that warnings like these could prevent a tragedy.

The system's volume is designed to operate at a lower level at night and in quiet neighborhoods. Metro will test the new warning system on 10 Metrobuses operating in the District over the next year.

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