'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

Play associated audio

(Nov. 29) POST-HOLIDAY HAPPINESS The holidays are a happy time and all, but there's a bevy of "happiness hotspots" on M Street in Northwest Washington tonight as author Dan Buettner discusses Thrive, his book about the happiest places on Earth, at National Geographic Live's Grosvenor Auditorium. Buettner plans to share highlights from his research on quality of life around the globe and even has some ideas on how to get your happy on in the District.

(Nov. 29-Jan. 9) FOUR WALLS, FIVE WOMEN True to its name, Four Walls, Five Women focuses on the contemporary visual art of five women and spreads the works across four walls at DC Arts Center on 18th Street through early January. The artists employ sundry materials to have an open dialogue about black femininity in the 21st century.

(Nov. 26-Dec. 12) MAD ARTISTS Quotidian Theatre has a comedic dialogue about Christmas, salvation, and the occult in The Seafarer. A stranger joins four friends for a Christmas Eve card game and a shot at redemption at The Writer's Center in Bethesda through Dec. 12.

Background music: Never Stop by Bad Plus

NPR

Peru's Pitmasters Bury Their Meat In The Earth, Inca-Style

Step up your summer grilling game by re-creating the ancient Peruvian way of cooking meat underground in your own backyard. It's called pachamanca, and it yields incredibly moist and smoky morsels.
NPR

Peru's Pitmasters Bury Their Meat In The Earth, Inca-Style

Step up your summer grilling game by re-creating the ancient Peruvian way of cooking meat underground in your own backyard. It's called pachamanca, and it yields incredibly moist and smoky morsels.
NPR

Jeb Bush's Wealth Skyrocketed After Leaving Governor's Office

Thirty-three years of tax returns — the most ever for a presidential candidate — show Bush earned $29 million since leaving office. He also paid an average tax rate of 36 percent over three decades.
NPR

Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph

Entrepreneurs are turning to Oak Ridge National Lab's supercomputer to make all sorts of things, including maps that are much more accurate in predicting how a neighborhood will fare in a flood.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.