'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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If you decided to stay put for the holiday, the District has a number of effortless getaways to offer:

(Nov. 25-Dec. 31) 6 TAKES ON LANDSCAPES Six artists present six takes on landscapes through the end of the year at Susan Calloway Fine Arts in Northwest Washington. Points of View presents contemporary landscape painting, with depictions both faithful and fantastical.

(Nov. 25) ANCIENT CHINESE JADES AND BRONZES And if you have a healthy appreciation for treasure, you're bound to enjoy Ancient Chinese Jades and Bronzes at Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art. After a decade of dormancy, Freer's trove of Chinese art returns to the limelight tomorrow and stays there for the foreseeable future. Four-thousand-year-old artifacts illustrate the expert craftsmanship of the Liangzhu culture.

(Nov. 25) TIBET IN SONG And if you want to stick with the Orient, Tibet in Song screens today at Washington's E Street Cinema. The documentary records the effects that 50 years of Chinese occupation has had on traditional Tibetan folk music, juxtaposing performances with coverage of the struggle for independence.

Background music: Everyone's A VIP To Someone by The Go! Team

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