Maryland Professor Finds Cocaine In Organic Herbal Tea | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Maryland Professor Finds Cocaine In Organic Herbal Tea

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When a Delaware woman claimed that drinking herbal tea caused her to fail a drug test and lose her job, a chemistry professor tested the tea and made an alarming discovery.

Dr. Miguel Mitchell says when he tested the Peruvian Delisse coca tea at his University lab in Salisbury Maryland, he was shocked at what he found.

"It turned out to be cocaine", he says, "not a breakdown product of cocaine, but cocaine itself, and it matched exactly."

Mitchell says there was enough cocaine in each tea bag to serve as a stimulant, similar to caffeine, but not enough to be addictive or get a person high.

Mitchell says what's even more alarming is that the tea is FDA-approved, and marketed as a 100 percent organic product that helps with weight loss, PMS, depression, and irritability.

"I'm really surprised that people are allowed to buy it," he says.

Mitchell says the lesson here is for consumers to be aware that just because something says it's organic, doesn't mean it's good for you.

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