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Ehrlich Camp Paid Thousands For Election Robocalls

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The campaign of former Maryland Gov. Robert Ehrlich has reported it paid a political consultant thousands of dollars for anonymous robocalls made on election night.

The Ehrlich campaign reports it paid $14,000 in the final days of the governor's race to the political consultant who has taken responsibility for ordering anonymous election-night robocalls. Those calls, made while the polls were still open on Nov. 2, suggested that Democrats relax and stay home.

The payments were included in a finance report made public earlier this week. It brings the total Ehrlich spent on services to political operative Julius Henson to more than $111,000 this year.

Ehrlich is a Republican -- Henson usually works for Democrats. Henson says the calls were "counterintuitive" and meant to inspire voters inclined to vote for Ehrlich to go to the polls.

Maryland's attorney general has filed a civil complaint in federal court alleging that the calls were intended to suppress voter turnout and violated federal law.

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