Ehrlich Camp Paid Thousands For Election Robocalls | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Ehrlich Camp Paid Thousands For Election Robocalls

Play associated audio

The campaign of former Maryland Gov. Robert Ehrlich has reported it paid a political consultant thousands of dollars for anonymous robocalls made on election night.

The Ehrlich campaign reports it paid $14,000 in the final days of the governor's race to the political consultant who has taken responsibility for ordering anonymous election-night robocalls. Those calls, made while the polls were still open on Nov. 2, suggested that Democrats relax and stay home.

The payments were included in a finance report made public earlier this week. It brings the total Ehrlich spent on services to political operative Julius Henson to more than $111,000 this year.

Ehrlich is a Republican -- Henson usually works for Democrats. Henson says the calls were "counterintuitive" and meant to inspire voters inclined to vote for Ehrlich to go to the polls.

Maryland's attorney general has filed a civil complaint in federal court alleging that the calls were intended to suppress voter turnout and violated federal law.

NPR

Speed Dating For Seniors Who Aren't Interested In Slowing Down

A new film follows daters ages 70 to 90 looking for love in five-minute intervals. "Speed dating for seniors" may sound funny, but The Age of Love is really about our lifelong need for intimacy.
NPR

Eat Your Veggies! Even The Ones From Fukushima

Foods from Fukushima, Japan, are back to pre-accident levels of radiation but people still aren't eating them. One way to ease concerns: a chemical that blocks radioactive cesium from entering plants.
WAMU 88.5

Van Hollen's Bid For Mikulski's Senate Seat Further Shakes Up Maryland Delegation

Maryland congressman Chris Van Hollen’s announcement he’s running in the Democratic primary for the open U.S. Senate seat is the beginning of a reshuffling of the state’s delegation in Congress.
NPR

Sharing Patient Records Is Still A Digital Dilemma For Doctors

There's good news and bad news about electronic medical records. They're now in most doctors' offices — but most doctors still can't easily share them.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.