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Airport Security Measures Don't Appear To Deter Travel

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The House and Senate have reached an FAA deal.
The House and Senate have reached an FAA deal.

New security measures -- and public reaction to them -- threatened to slow down holiday travel at airports. But at Reagan National Airport, that hasn't panned out, and it hasn't prevented people from traveling.

An ABC-Washington Post poll found that about two-thirds of people don't object to the use of new, advanced body imaging machines at use at airports these days, including at Reagan National. Mike Caldwell counts himself among them.

"Quite frankly, two-thirds of the people in this country are overweight or obese and TSA wants to see you naked about as much as you want them to see you naked. So let's just get on with it," he says.

Half of people do object though to aggressive pat-downs. But John Townsend with AAA Mid-Atlantic says the objections or worries about slower lines haven't kept people from traveling.

"They seem to accept it as a fact of life in air passengers since 9/11," Townsend says.

Thirty-five thousand people are expected to travel this year from the area for Thanksgiving.


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