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Ocean City Man An 'Inspiration' To Oprah

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When an Ocean City man was diagnosed with stage-four lung cancer, he battled to not only help himself, but to also help others fighting the disease. But that journey took him to the Oprah Winfrey Show.

Ten months ago, P.J. Aldridge was given a few months left to live. Yesterday, he ended up being honored by Winfrey.

Hundreds of people packed into an Ocean City restaurant to watch their beloved friend tell his story and help raise awareness and money for the foundation he started which bears his name.

But, as Aldridge explains, it didn't turn out the way they had anticipated.

"..then it turns out that she says, 'Hey guys, I gotcha. I want to give you guys all this stuff back for what you do for other people,'" Aldridge says.

Winfrey showered Aldridge and her other inspirational guests in the audience with tens of thousands of dollars worth of lavish gifts, including a 2012 Volkswagon Beetle.

Aldridge says he'll use the gifts to raise money for the foundation. He also says meeting Winfrey and being honored as any sort of hero gives him one more reason to keep fighting to get better.

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