EPA Says States Progress On Chesapeake Bay Pollution But... | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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EPA Says States Progress On Chesapeake Bay Pollution But...

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States in the Chesapeake Bay watershed have until Nov. 29 to tell the EPA how they plan to reduce pollution in the Bay.

Maryland, Virginia, and the District, along with Delaware, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and New York all have rivers that drain into the Chesapeake Bay.

When they submitted initial plans to the EPA in September explaining how they would curb pollution in the Bay, the EPA said they were seriously deficient -- except for Maryland's and the District's.

States all said they would reduce pollution, but didn't sufficiently explain how.

Katherine Antos is the water quality coordinator for the EPA's Chesapeake Bay Program. She says since then, all of the states have made some progress, but she still has some concerns.

"I just want to emphasize that unless these improvements that we've asked for are fully addressed, EPA will still need to apply some degree of backstop allocations," Antos says.

"Backstop allocations" means the EPA will take some things into its own hands: tightening regulations of waste water treatment plans, concentrated animal feeding operations and storm water permits.

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