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Defeated Md. Congressman Doesn't Push 2012 Off The Table

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Just weeks after a more than 13-point defeat, 1st District Maryland Democrat Frank Kratovil is mulling a run in 2012.

A spokesperson for Kratovil confirmed to WAMU that the defeated congressman is considering a run in 2012, saying Kratovil "hasn't decided what direction to go in."

Paul Herrnson of the University of Maryland says a lot of issues will play into his final decision.

"There's the national economy that candidates need to consider, and then there's also the local economy," Herrnson says.

Unemployment in the Eastern Shore district is worse than the rest of the state -- a theme incoming Republican Rep. Andy Harris touted throughout the campaign. Herrnson says Kratovil must also take into account one other factor:

"And that is the performance of the incumbent. If Andy Harris gets off to a good start, he may seem more difficult to challenge than if he gets off to a poor start," Herrnson says.

The progressive Americans United for Change says it's going to start running ads against Harris because after running against the health reform law on the trail, Harris voiced frustration that he has to wait a month to receive government-subsidized health insurance from Congress.

Harris could not be reached for comment.

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