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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(Nov. 22-Dec. 19) FROM STRINGS TO ROPES Keegan Theatre's Golden Boy follows a conflicted individual from the strings to the ropes. Joe Bonaparte can't decide whether he wants to be a violinist or a pugilist. He does a cost-benefit analysis tonight through mid-December at Church Street Theater in Northwest Washington.

(Nov. 22-Dec. 18) FROM THE STREET TO THE STUDIO Washington's Irvine Contemporary hosts Street/Studio 2.0 until the works are released back into their native urban environments on December 18th. The second installment of the exhibit showcases visual art innovators who value accessibility -- be it producing murals or plastering works all over the Internet.

(Nov. 22-Dec. 18) DIN DIN And Industry Gallery hosts an unorthodox dinner party in Northeast Washington for the next month. din-din is an exhibition of new work by Jerry Mischak. It has nearly everything you'd expect: 12 chairs, 40 plates, cutlery, glasses, and wine bottles, but they're all wrapped in 3,000 yards of orange vinyl tape. And there’s no food, because it's all about the memories.

Background music: Smothered Mate by Chilly Gonzales

NPR

Lawsuit Will Decide Who Owns 'Star Trek' Language Klingon

Paramount Pictures holds the copyright to Klingon, spoken by some characters in "Star Trek." The Language Creation Society is arguing Klingon is a real language, and is therefore not copyrightable.
NPR

Germany's Beer Purity Law Is 500 Years Old. Is It Past Its Sell-By Date?

For centuries, German law has stipulated that beer can only be made from four ingredients. But as Germany embraces craft beer, some believe the law impedes good brewing.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - April 29, 2016

Kojo reviews Maryland's primary results and what they mean for the region and November's elections. The Supreme Court hears arguments in the case of Virginia's former governor. And a major funder of youth programs in the District is bankrupt.

NPR

U.S. Steel Says China Is Using Cyber Stealth To Steal Its Secrets

The steelmaker is asking a U.S. agency to investigate its claims that the Chinese government not only dumps steel at unfair prices, but also uses computer hackers to steal intellectual property.

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