Chesapeake Oystermen Go On Strike Over Pricing Battle | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Chesapeake Oystermen Go On Strike Over Pricing Battle

Play associated audio

Many of Maryland's Chesapeake oystermen are on strike in protest of dropping prices for their catch.

Only 600 people live on Deal Island, but on a normal day at Scotts Cove Marina, the shipyard is bustling with dozens of boats counting their catch of oysters. But this week the boats are docked, and the Marina is eerily quiet.

Buyers have dropped their payout prices from $42 per bushel to $35, and when they threatened to drop the price by another $5, oystermen like Bunky Chance went on strike.

"On one hand, it's not fair and on the other hand it's the way the game is played," Chance says. "The market can set its price and what are we going to do? We can't go somewhere else...[and] try and catch a different oyster and get a better price, because we are stuck here."

Chance says government regulations have restricted 10,000 acres of farm-able waters in the Chesapeake Bay, and that, coupled with an influx of oysters coming into the market from Texas and South Carolina, has put the oystermen on the island in a fight for survival.

NPR

Lost — Then Found — Along The Border, Objects Become Art

A photographer's journey along the U.S.-Mexico border turned up dramatic images of lost possessions. Those found items were later made into instruments that sound just like that desolate landscape.
NPR

Need A New Sweet Potato Recipe For Your Thanksgiving Table? Try Gnocchi

Because some cooks like to mix it up for Thanksgiving, we offer a Found Recipe from our archives: Julia Della Croce's purple sweet potato gnocchi.
NPR

As Gay Marriages Rise, Now Comes The Case For Same-Sex Divorce

Many couples have traveled to states where gay marriage is recognized to get hitched. Those who do have a much harder time getting divorced once they get back home.
NPR

Car Ride Service Puts Gender In The Driver's Seat

Car share programs are extremely popular, but so are concerns for safety. NPR's Tess Vigeland talks to Stella Mateo, founder of SheRides, which allows passengers to choose the gender of their driver.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.