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DCPS Chancellor A No-Show At Office Hours

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In her first month as D.C.'s interim school chancellor, Kaya Henderson is trying to engage more with the public, holding open office hours and community events. But she's already disappointing some who are trying to approach her about concerns.

A dozen people came to the office hours hoping to meet Henderson Tuesday night.

Miranda Woods, 13, says she wants her principal reinstated because the school culture has changed. "Students get into fights, they write on stalls in the bathroom," Woods says.

Clarise Harmon wanted to talk about a lack of school supplies at her daughter's school: "Toilet paper in the bathroom, paper towels in the bathroom, soap for the kids to wash their hands."

But Henderson canceled at the last minute.

And that upset Marvin Tucker, who says parents are shut out of DCPS.

But Peggy O'Brien, the head of Public Engagement in DCPS, says there is a new effort for more senior staff to be out in the community.

"The idea that there are lots of people working in schools and those folks should have a lot more chances to interact with the public," O'Brien says.

She blamed a "scheduling conflict" for Henderson's absence.

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