Art Beat: Wednesday, Nov. 17 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Art Beat: Wednesday, Nov. 17

Play associated audio

"Art Beat" with Sean Rameswaram:

(Nov. 17-29) SUDDENSPACE Art has a tendency to just pop-up in places: at the Metro, in an alley, or in 5000 square feet of empty retail space next to the Pentagon. suddenspace on Columbia Pike in Arlington through the end of November is of the latter persuasion. Emerging artists from the D.C. area and beyond add character to an otherwise empty edifice with intimate paintings, large-scale sculptures, and site-specific installations.

(Nov. 17) SALMAN RUSHDIE Salman Rushdie pops-up at Northwest's Sixth & I Historic Synagogue tonight at 7. The author discusses his latest offering Luka and the Fire of Life, which follows a boy as he fights to save his father in a magical world of mystery and Badly Behaved Gods.

(Nov. 19-23) FLORENCIA EN EL AMAZONAS And there's more magic to go around this weekend at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in College Park, Maryland. Mexican composer Daniel Catán’s opera Florencia en el Amazonas employs magical realism to tell the love story of Florencia the soprano and her main man, Cristóbal the butterfly hunter.

Background music: Crips by Ratatat

NPR

'Little House,' Big Demand: Never Underestimate Laura Ingalls Wilder

Wilder's memoir reveals that she witnessed more violence than you'd ever know from her children's books. The South Dakota State Historical Society can barely keep up with demand for the autobiography.
NPR

Coffee Horror: Parody Pokes At Environmental Absurdity Of K-Cups

The market for single-serving coffee pods is dominated by Keurig's K-Cups. But they aren't recyclable, and critics say that's making a monster of an environmental mess. Meet the K-Cup Godzilla.
NPR

Insurance Choices Dwindle In Rural California As Blue Shield Pulls Back

When Blue Shield Of California stopped selling individual health policies in many zip codes in 2014, even insurance agents were surprised. Blue Shield says it dropped out to keep premiums low.
NPR

Charles Townes, Laser Inventor, Black Hole Discoverer, Dies At 99

Physicist Charles Townes died Tuesday. He was a key inventor of the laser and won the Nobel Prize for his discovery in 1964. But his career didn't end there.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.