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Art Beat: Wednesday, Nov. 17

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"Art Beat" with Sean Rameswaram:

(Nov. 17-29) SUDDENSPACE Art has a tendency to just pop-up in places: at the Metro, in an alley, or in 5000 square feet of empty retail space next to the Pentagon. suddenspace on Columbia Pike in Arlington through the end of November is of the latter persuasion. Emerging artists from the D.C. area and beyond add character to an otherwise empty edifice with intimate paintings, large-scale sculptures, and site-specific installations.

(Nov. 17) SALMAN RUSHDIE Salman Rushdie pops-up at Northwest's Sixth & I Historic Synagogue tonight at 7. The author discusses his latest offering Luka and the Fire of Life, which follows a boy as he fights to save his father in a magical world of mystery and Badly Behaved Gods.

(Nov. 19-23) FLORENCIA EN EL AMAZONAS And there's more magic to go around this weekend at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in College Park, Maryland. Mexican composer Daniel Catán’s opera Florencia en el Amazonas employs magical realism to tell the love story of Florencia the soprano and her main man, Cristóbal the butterfly hunter.

Background music: Crips by Ratatat

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