Art Beat: Tuesday, Nov. 16 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat: Tuesday, Nov. 16

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"Art Beat" with Sean Rameswaram:

(Nov. 16) ORDINARY OBJECTS, EXTRAORDINARY ART Sarah Sze makes remarkable things out of very unremarkable things. She takes the ephemera of everyday life – jeans, tea bags, water bottles – and makes sprawling site-specific sculptures. The MacArthur "Genius" Award-winner offers insights into her work at the Smithsonian American Art Museum tonight at 7 as part of their Distinguished Lectures series.

(Nov. 16) CLOTHING THE CONVERSATION Artist Annet Couwenberg works primarily with textiles and fabrics, but she's been known to work a crowd, too. While living in the Netherlands she spent time with Muslim women discussing the politics of fashion and cultural displacement. She talks about her project, Clothing as Interface: Cross Cultural Muslim Identity, this evening at the University of Maryland in College Park.

(Nov. 17-28) HOUSE OF GOLD A different breed of fashion politics is at play in House of Gold at Washington's Wooly Mammoth Theatre through the end of the month. Playwright Gregory Moss focuses on the ugly side of child beauty pageants in the black comedy.

Background music: Pacific Theme by Broken Social Scene

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