: News

Filed Under:

2011 Redistricting Adds To Busy Year For Fairfax Leaders, Voters

Play associated audio

Today the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors starts to lay the groundwork for redistricting, a process that could have major ramifications for next year's elections.

This marks the start of a busy twelve months for supervisors and voters.

Fairfax voters will have 11 different races to keep an eye on in the coming year, including contests for legislative, school board, and county offices.

"For people who like elections," County Board of Supervisors Chair Sharon Bulova says, "next year is your year."

Bulova is up for reelection too.

But because it's a redistricting year, some voters won't know exactly which district they'll be voting in until next summer, when the new districts are approved at the federal level.

In Fairfax one boundary that's likely to change is between the Hunter Mill and Dranesville districts.

That means Dennis Husch, a Herndon resident and Republican who's already announced a run for Dranesville supervisor, isn't 100 percent sure his house will still be in Dranesville next year.

"Whether that means Herndon's three precincts stay in Dranesville -- what will happen will happen, and we'll deal with that when it occurs," Husch says.

The redistricting process means Fairfax will also likely be moving its primaries from June, back to August. For now Husch doesn't have a primary opponent; he's hoping it stays that way.


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
WAMU 88.5

World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


What Is Li-Fi And When Will You Use It To Download Everything Faster?

Li-Fi is a lot like Wi-Fi, but it uses light to transmit data. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to the man who invented the faster alternative: Harald Haas.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.