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Art Beat: Monday, Nov. 15

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"Art Beat" with Sabri Ben-Achour:

(Nov. 15) THE AUTUMN DEFENSE If you've been having some seasonal terrors ever since the leaves started turning, fear not! The Autumn Defense is here to lull your worries away with their poppy brand of alternative country music. The defensive duo, who spend the rest of their time rounding out the lineup of indie-juggernaut Wilco, drop by Iota Club & Cafe in Arlington tonight at 8.

(Nov. 15-Jan. 16) MASTERWORKS SIDE BY SIDE Northwest Washington's Phillips Collection is doing its best to provide some arresting juxtapositions in Side by Side. The collection's own modernist masterworks are presented alongside works on loan from Oberlin College's Allen Memorial Art Museum that sample from a range of periods and countries. It's a way of seeing how art history has unfolded as a conversation across time and culture. Runs through mid-January.

(Nov. 15) KILLADELPHIA And Killadelphia: Mixtape of a City is a one-man show that sheds light on the Philadelphia's inmates, some of whom are employed to beautify the city while serving out life sentences. Killdalphia plays tonight at Washington's Wooly Mammoth Theater. Proceeds benefit the National New Play Network.

NPR

Woody Allen's 'Fading Gigolo' Full Of Loneliness And Longing

In the new comedy Fading Gigolo, John Turturro plays the title character, and Woody Allen plays his pimp. This story originally broadcast on All Things Considered on April 18, 2014.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

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