Art Beat: Monday, Nov. 15 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat: Monday, Nov. 15

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"Art Beat" with Sabri Ben-Achour:

(Nov. 15) THE AUTUMN DEFENSE If you've been having some seasonal terrors ever since the leaves started turning, fear not! The Autumn Defense is here to lull your worries away with their poppy brand of alternative country music. The defensive duo, who spend the rest of their time rounding out the lineup of indie-juggernaut Wilco, drop by Iota Club & Cafe in Arlington tonight at 8.

(Nov. 15-Jan. 16) MASTERWORKS SIDE BY SIDE Northwest Washington's Phillips Collection is doing its best to provide some arresting juxtapositions in Side by Side. The collection's own modernist masterworks are presented alongside works on loan from Oberlin College's Allen Memorial Art Museum that sample from a range of periods and countries. It's a way of seeing how art history has unfolded as a conversation across time and culture. Runs through mid-January.

(Nov. 15) KILLADELPHIA And Killadelphia: Mixtape of a City is a one-man show that sheds light on the Philadelphia's inmates, some of whom are employed to beautify the city while serving out life sentences. Killdalphia plays tonight at Washington's Wooly Mammoth Theater. Proceeds benefit the National New Play Network.

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