Arlington Board to Vote on Comprehensive Natural Resource Protection Plan | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Arlington Board to Vote on Comprehensive Natural Resource Protection Plan

Play associated audio

On Saturday morning the Arlington County board is considering the county's first-ever comprehensive natural resource protection plan.

The proposed plan stems directly from a natural resource survey performed by the county between 2005 and 2008.

The survey covered all county owned land and some federally owned land within Arlington's borders.

The survey looked at things such as urban wildlife, native plants, as well as water resources, and the plan contains 19 different recommendations for managing those elements.

County Chairman Jay Fisette says the plan is a big undertaking, but shouldn't actually cost the county much in the near future.

"A lot of this will be built into the daily work and daily activity of what we do, so I don't see significant upfront costs, at least in the near term," he says.

The multi-year process uncovered some plant and animal species once thought gone from the county, but it also led to a conclusion disturbing to local naturalists: 50 to 75 percent of the county's historic wildlife is gone.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 21, 2015

You can immerse yourself in the life and music of Gustav Mahler or hear what students from highly-respected music conservatories have to offer.
NPR

Blue Bell Widens Recall To All Of Its Products Over Listeria Worries

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called it "a complex and ongoing multistate outbreak of listeriosis occurring over an extended period of several years."

NPR

A Timeline Of Hillary Clinton's Evolution On Trade

The presidential hopeful has had trouble being consistent on trade. Labor unions are important in Democratic politics, but her work as secretary of state is putting her in a bind on trade.
NPR

What Can #NOLASCHOOLS Teach Us?

Michel Martin is hosting a conversation about education in New Orleans, ten years after Hurricane Katrina sparked a transformation of public schools there. Add your voice at #NOLASCHOOLS.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.