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Arlington Board to Vote on Comprehensive Natural Resource Protection Plan

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On Saturday morning the Arlington County board is considering the county's first-ever comprehensive natural resource protection plan.

The proposed plan stems directly from a natural resource survey performed by the county between 2005 and 2008.

The survey covered all county owned land and some federally owned land within Arlington's borders.

The survey looked at things such as urban wildlife, native plants, as well as water resources, and the plan contains 19 different recommendations for managing those elements.

County Chairman Jay Fisette says the plan is a big undertaking, but shouldn't actually cost the county much in the near future.

"A lot of this will be built into the daily work and daily activity of what we do, so I don't see significant upfront costs, at least in the near term," he says.

The multi-year process uncovered some plant and animal species once thought gone from the county, but it also led to a conclusion disturbing to local naturalists: 50 to 75 percent of the county's historic wildlife is gone.

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