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NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (AP) Northrop Grumman says it's won an $189.2 million Navy contract to keep working on the design of the USS Gerald R. Ford nuclear aircraft carrier. Work on the Gerald R. Ford started with the laying of its keel Nov. 14, 2009.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) The Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries says it's trying to lure former hunters back to the deer woods. The recruitment drive comes as Virginia's main deer season approaches. The gun season is scheduled to open Saturday.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) Former Secretary of Finance John W. Forbes II is set to be sentenced in a $4 million fraud that targeted Virginia's fund that promotes economic development in tobacco-dependent communities. The 54-year-old Forbes pleaded guilty in August to one count of wire fraud while the case was under seal. He will be sentenced in federal court in Richmond on Monday.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) Dark days are ahead for the white pages. Regulators in many states are giving phone companies permission to stop printing residential listings since fewer people are using them. Companies like Verizon and AT+T argue that consumers now depend on the Internet and mobile phone applications to search for the numbers they need.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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