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Art Beat: Thursday, Nov. 11

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"Art Beat" with Sabri Ben-Achour:

(Nov. 11-Mar. 13) OASIS IKATS At the turn of the 19th century, Central Asian men really had a serious fashion sense about them, especially the ones who lived in oases. Men living in remote regions were often defined by their ikats, finely woven, brightly dyed fabrics. Washington's Textile Museum provides some model examples and background in Colors of the Oasis: Central Asian Ikats through March of next year.

(Nov. 11-Dec. 12) THE MASTER AND MARGARITA The Master and Margarita has nothing to do with Jimmy Buffet and everything to do with Satan and the Soviet Union. Synetic Theater stages an adaptation of Mikhail Bulgakov's tale of good, evil, and sacrifice in a repressive society at the Lansburgh Theatre in Northwest Washington for the next month.

(Nov. 12) HARP ON SAX ON SILENCE Pictures on Silence belie their name with a harp and a saxophone. The crack chamber duo rocks originals and covers at the Catholic University of America's John Paul Hall in Northeast Washington tomorrow night at 7:30.

Background music: Around the World by Daft Punk

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