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Connolly Says Close Victory Won't Change Him

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Connolly says the closeness of this year's election won't change the way he votes on controversial issues.
Jonathan Wilson
Connolly says the closeness of this year's election won't change the way he votes on controversial issues.

In Virginia, Congressman Gerry Connolly says the narrowness of his victory over Republican challenger Keith Fimian won't make him change his approach to governing or campaigning in years to come.

Fimian conceded defeat in a written statement released Tuesday.

Connolly first claimed victory a week ago, on election night, and only saw his slim lead grow during post-election canvassing. He says despite the tight race, it would be foolish for him to start avoiding the issues that divided voters this year.

"I don't think the secret to getting reelected is running away from tough issues. And voters can, over time, come to appreciate that," Connolly says.

Connolly says two years from now the electorate will be larger and different issues will be top-of-mind.

But Fairfax County Republican Committee Chair Anthony Bedell says one thing the election did prove is that Republicans in Northern Virginia can be a force.

"I think we've finally got our act together in the Fairfax County party and in the 11th district as well," Bedell says.

Connolly bested Fimian by less than 1,000 votes. More than 220,000 votes were cast in the 11th district.

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