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Art Beat: Wednesday, Nov. 10

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"Art Beat" with Sabri Ben-Achour:

(Nov. 10-30) ARLINGTON ARTISPHERE If you've noticed a preponderance of artsy types milling about the Rosslyn Metro station, it may have something to do with Artisphere on Wilson Blvd. through the end of the month. The three-story space affords actors, artists, dancers, and musicians of all stripes the space needed to flourish. This week features Skateboarding Side Effects, in which artists capture the movements of skateboarding through photography, drawing, painting, sculpture, and film.

(Nov. 10) KAWASAKI'S ROSE And for the best in Czech film, there's always the Lions of Czech Film series at Washington's Avalon Theatre. Kawasaki's Rose screens tonight. The film follows an eminent scientist with a skeleton-filled closet through travails with his family and fame.

(Nov. 10-March 27) PAST, PRESENT, PERHAPS FUTURE Buildings can become ruins, and sometimes, so can art. Mario Garcia Torres and Cyprien Gaillard explore the remnants of recent architecture and art movements in Directions, opening today at the Hirshhorn in Northwest Washington. Both artists use photography and music to ask some serious questions about the ephemeral aspects of art through March.

Background music: Everybody Daylight by Bright Black Morning Light

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