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Art Beat: Wednesday, Nov. 10

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"Art Beat" with Sabri Ben-Achour:

(Nov. 10-30) ARLINGTON ARTISPHERE If you've noticed a preponderance of artsy types milling about the Rosslyn Metro station, it may have something to do with Artisphere on Wilson Blvd. through the end of the month. The three-story space affords actors, artists, dancers, and musicians of all stripes the space needed to flourish. This week features Skateboarding Side Effects, in which artists capture the movements of skateboarding through photography, drawing, painting, sculpture, and film.

(Nov. 10) KAWASAKI'S ROSE And for the best in Czech film, there's always the Lions of Czech Film series at Washington's Avalon Theatre. Kawasaki's Rose screens tonight. The film follows an eminent scientist with a skeleton-filled closet through travails with his family and fame.

(Nov. 10-March 27) PAST, PRESENT, PERHAPS FUTURE Buildings can become ruins, and sometimes, so can art. Mario Garcia Torres and Cyprien Gaillard explore the remnants of recent architecture and art movements in Directions, opening today at the Hirshhorn in Northwest Washington. Both artists use photography and music to ask some serious questions about the ephemeral aspects of art through March.

Background music: Everybody Daylight by Bright Black Morning Light

WAMU 88.5

Remains In Jamestown Linked To Early Colonial Leaders

Scientists from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and The Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation say they've identified four men buried in the earliest English church in America.
WAMU 88.5

The Democracy Of The Diner

Whether the decor is faux '50s silver and neon or authentic greasy spoon, diners are classic Americana, down to the familiar menu items. Rich, poor, black, white--all rub shoulders in the vinyl booths and at formica counters. We explore the enduring appeal and nostalgia of the diner.

WAMU 88.5

D.C. Council Member David Grosso

D.C. Council Member and Chair of the Committee on Education David Grosso joins us to discuss local public policy issues, including the challenges facing D.C. Public Schools.

NPR

Researchers Warn Against 'Autonomous Weapons' Arms Race

Already, researcher Stuart Russell says, sentry robots in South Korea "can spot and track a human being for a distance of 2 miles — and can very accurately kill that person."

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