Art Beat: Tuesday, Nov. 9 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat: Tuesday, Nov. 9

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"Art Beat" with Sabri Ben-Achour:

(Nov. 9-Jan. 2) EVERY TONGUE CONFESS Arena Stage may have just recently reopened, but it's wasting no time getting into the thick of American theater. Every tongue confess premieres tonight at the Mead Center in Southwest Washington. Ancient myth meets modern magic in Boligee, Ala., where the townsfolk conjure spirits and tell stories of loss and redemption to pass a hot summer's day.

(Nov. 9) JÓNSI, 9:30 Iceland's Jónsi) voiced the ethereal sounds of Sigur Rós for years. Now, he's doing his own thing and it's equally otherworldly. The singer brings his falsetto and orchestral pop arrangements to Washington's 9:30 Club tonight. The stage set up has been described as living and breathing and there are a lot of costumes.

(Nov. 10) WHAT HOPE LOOKS LIKE Hope House DC offers some apolitical hope tomorrow night at the Long View Gallery in Northwest Washington. Come See What Hope Looks Like features the murals of children and fathers from the "Hope House summer camp behind bars," a program that seeks to strengthen the ties between imprisoned fathers and their families.

Background music: Pants by Orbital

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