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Former Justice Stevens Honored Along With Japanese American WWII Veterans

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Former Justice John Paul Stevens was honored by the National Japanese American Memorial Foundation on Thursday for his history of fighting against discrimination.
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Former Justice John Paul Stevens was honored by the National Japanese American Memorial Foundation on Thursday for his history of fighting against discrimination.

It's now been 10 years since the creation of the Japanese American World War II memorial in Washington--and this year the group that led the charge behind the memorial is honoring a retiring Washington legend.

The National Japanese American Memorial Foundation is singling out recently retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens for his efforts over the years to fight against discrimination.

Stevens spoke at a banquet honoring him and Japanese American World War II veterans on Thursday.

He used the opportunity to draw a parallel between the mistreatment and internment of Japanese Americans during that war, and the fears regarding Muslim Americans today.

"Ignorance--that is to say, fear of the unknown--is the source of most invidious prejudice," Stevens says.

Justice Stevens, a World War II veteran himself, served on the high court for 35 years--the third-longest tenure in the court's history.

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