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Levy Trial Prosecutors Struggle To Directly Link Evidence To The Suspect

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In the District, attorneys presented physical evidence during day seven in the Chandra Levy murder trial.

Prosecutors have not definitively linked that evidence to the suspect, Ingmar Guandique.

The evidence, which includes clothing, a tape player, and other personal items, were found not far from where Levy's remains were discovered in Rock Creek Park back in May 2002.

FBI forensic biologist Robyn Wolfe tells the jury that she tested a number of stains found on Levy's clothing.

Wolfe says she identified seven stains as potentially blood, or other bodily fluid. She added, the tests were presumptive, meaning she was unable to actually confirm the presence of either blood or bodily fluid in follow-up tests.

Fingerprint technician Oscar Cheshire also testifies that he is not able to lift usable fingerprints on the cassette player or personal items which could link Guandique to Levy's murder.

Prosecutors admit there is a lack of direct evidence in the case.

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