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BALTIMORE (AP) A Bel Air man has pleaded guilty in a scheme to embezzle more than $370,000 from the ocean cargo company where he worked. Forty-nine-year-old Timothy Kany Sr., the former Baltimore office manager for K-Line America, pleaded guilty to mail fraud yesterday in U.S. District Court.

KEEDYSVILLE, Md. (AP) The Washington County Sheriff's Office says a flagger working a road construction site was hit by a car as she held a stop sign. Deputies say 52-year-old Vale Lynn Hawkins of New Windsor was taken to Washington County Hospital. Authorities charged the 86-year-old driver, Lloyd Grim of Sharpsburg, with failure to obey a traffic device.

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) Two teenage boys have been charged with trying to kill a man they robbed as he walked from his car to a Silver Spring apartment complex. Montgomery County police say they're looking for a third suspect.

BALTIMORE (AP) Baltimore officials have launched a program to reduce the number of vacant homes causing a blight on the city. "Vacants to Value" was unveiled yesterday.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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