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Md. Attorney General Investigates Voter Suppression

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Polls didn't close in Maryland until 8 p.m. on Tuesday. But around 6 p.m. Democratic voters started receiving robocalls from a D.C. area code telling them everything was OK and that no more action--like actual voting--was necessary.

The attorney general's office has this copy of the call: "We're OK. Relax. Everything is fine. The only thing left is to watch on TV tonight. Congratulations and thank you."

The calls didn't work, as Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley retained his seat.

But Attorney General Doug Gansler is now investigating the calls. His spokesperson says the allegation is voter suppression, which is a misdemeanor under state law. It carries a fine up to $2,500 and up to five years in prison.

Some news agencies also reported voters were feeling intimidated in Montgomery County, Md., by firefighters who were campaigning on the ambulance fee referendum, which would pass fees for service on to residents' insurance companies. But the attorney general's office has received no complaints about any incidents in the county.

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