D.C. Jewish Community Responds To Terror Threat | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

D.C. Jewish Community Responds To Terror Threat

Play associated audio

By Colin Campbell

After investigators discovered explosives on cargo planes from Yemen headed to locations in Chicago connected to synagogues, some members of D.C.'s Jewish community say they are also on a heightened state of alert.

Jason Isaacson, with the American Jewish Committee, says discoveries of the explosives in Dubai and England demonstrate how extremism makes everyone a target of terrorism.

"Extremism targets moderate voices, targets representatives of the Jewish community, targets institutions prominent to the American civic life," Isaacson says.

The AJC, one of the oldest Jewish advocacy organizations, is located in a secure building in downtown D.C. Getting into the office requires being buzzed through several locked doors under video surveillance.

The AJC title isn't even on the marquis.

Despite that security, Isaacson says he'd like to see a stronger global effort to fight terrorism.

"I guess I find alarming the fact that there are still some individuals in some countries that need to take this issue a little more seriously," Isaacson says. "They need to work a little bit harder. They need to work a little more closely with the United States and with other forces that are trying to rid the world of the threat of terrorism."

Isaacson says he and some other members of D.C.'s Jewish community are concerned but remain confident that U.S. law enforcement agencies are staying ahead of the threats.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Oct. 1

Music from West Africa and photography from South East Asia come to the D.C. area.

NPR

From Kale To Pale Ale, A Love Of Bitter May Be In Your Genes

Researchers have found a gene that affects how strongly you experience bitter flavors. And those who aren't as sensitive eat about 200 more servings of vegetables per year.
NPR

Obama Sidesteps Midterm Campaigning As Approval Ratings Slump

The president's job approval rating is somewhere in the low 40s. That means there are a lot of places where his presence would hurt more than it helps.
NPR

Facebook Apologizes For Name Policy That Affected LGBT Community

The social networking site will not change its requirement for people to use "real" names on their profiles, but it will adjust how alleged violations are reported and enforced.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.