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Coons Beats O'Donnell By A Landslide In Delaware

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The highly watched race in Delaware between Tea Party candidate Christine O'Donnell and Democrat Chris Coons appears to have ended in a landslide victory for coons.

There was a collective sigh of relief at the Dogfish Head Craft Brewery in Rehoboth Beach when the numbers started rolling in just after 8 p.m. showing Coons winning Vice President Joe Biden's vacant Senate seat in Delaware by a sizable margin.

O'Donnell, who accrued huge media spotlight for everything ranging from her proclaimed former dabbling in witchcraft to her stances on masturbation, couldn't translate the attention to support at the polls, as Coons soundly defeated her by almost a two to one margin.

Delaware Board of Elections Commissioner Elaine Manlove says O'Donnell's supporters had complaints filed against them in all three counties in the state for their loud and often intimidating demonstrations at the polls earlier today.

For Democrats, Coons' overwhelming victory could be deemed as a small victory in an otherwise tough evening in which they already are projected to lose control of the House of Representatives.

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